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Am I Pregnant: Early symptoms of Pregnancy

To find out if you're pregnant, you can get a pregnancy test from the first day you lose your period.

I'm pregnant: first symptoms of pregnancy

If you have had unprotected sex in the last 5 days and do not want to be pregnant, you may be able to use emergency contraception.
  • No-fault period:
If you have a regular monthly cycle, the oldest and most reliable sign of pregnancy is a lost period.

Sometimes pregnant women have some bleeding and very mild cramps (similar to menstrual cramps) at the time their period should have.
Other early signs of pregnancy include:

  1. feeling sick or sick – this is commonly referred to as tomorrow, Illness, but it can happen at any time of the day, but if you feel unwell and can't hold anything, see a family doctor. 
  2. Chest changes – they can get bigger and feel as tender as they could before the period, and antew may also appear, veins may appear more, and nipples may darken and stand out.
  3. You may need to urinate more often - you may find that you need to get up at night.
  4. Obstructed.
  5. increased vaginal discharge without pain or irritation – the discharge is usually white and milky.
  6. feeling tired.
  7. they have a strange taste in their mouths – many women describe it as metallic.
  8. "Get out" some things, like tea, coffee, tobacco smoke, or fatty foods - you may even notice that you have a sudden desire for certain foods.
  9. Talk to a doctor as soon as you think you are pregnant, whether you have had a pregnancy test or not.

Start prenatal care:

  1. If you want to continue your pregnancy, it's a good idea to start your prenatal care as soon as possible.
  2. Contact a local family doctor or maternity service to begin your prenatal care.
  3. Get advice and support if you're not sure if you want to be pregnant.
  4. If you're not sure if you want to be pregnant, you can talk to a doctor about it.

You can obtain accurate and confidential information (even if you are under the age of 16) from:

  1. a family doctor or nurse to your family doctor.
  2. Family Planning Association (FPA) website.
  3. Brook, a youth sex health charity.
  4. a contraceptive clinic.
  5. a sex clinic (also called Genitoinaria Medicine or GUM, clinic).
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